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Marine Corps Marathon transfer, defer deadline is Aug. 31

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Heads up, runners: If you need to transfer or defer your 2014 Marine Corps Marathon entry then you need to act before Sunday night.

The deadline for both programs is Aug. 31 at midnight. After that you’re out of luck.

Related: See the 2014 course changes here.

Marine Corps Marathon announces 2014 course, interactive map

Marine Corps Marathon announces 2014 course, interactive map

The folks at the Marine Corps Marathon have rolled out an interactive map of the marathon’s 2014 route, which includes three key course changes.

The course will still start on Route 110 in Arlington, Virginia, and finish at the Iwo Jima  Marine Corps War Memorial.

But this year’s course will send runners from Pennsylvania Avenue onto 1st Street Northwest, just below the Capitol at Mile 19. Then at Mile 23 in Crystal City, runners will encounter an out-and-back section along 12th Street South as it becomes Crystal Drive. The final change will be the new eastern approach to the Pentagon from the newly developed Long Bridge Drive.

Runners will toe the line on Oct. 26.

Still looking for a bib? The transfer program is open until Aug. 31. The new runner must pay a $40 transfer fee and must complete the transfer process by Sept. 3.

Or, skip the transfer process and run on a charity team. Find the list here.

Military Muscle | 6 therapeutic stretches to help you look & perform better

Military Muscle | 6 therapeutic stretches to help you look & perform better

You’ve probably heard of the two principal styles of stretching: dynamic and static. 

Dynamic — holding the stretch for about a two-count — looks almost like a continuous movement. The focus is on warming up and loosening the muscles.

Static — some call it “passive” — is the familiar 20- to 30-second stretch typically done at the end of an event or competition when the muscles are already warm and ready for the lengthening that they will undergo.

These static stretches are normally done in two, sometimes three, reps. The most lengthening happens on the second and third rep.

The stretches listed here are static and work you through the majority of your muscles. Do these after your workout. If you have a stretching day in your plan, do some mild exercise first so your muscles are warm prior to stretching.

PT365 Run Plans | Give blisters the rub: 12 anti-chafe products to make your long runs hurt a little less

PT365 Run Plans | Give blisters the rub: 12 anti-chafe products to make your long runs hurt a little less

Going long for the first time? Make sure you protect your skin from one of running’s biggest foes: friction.

Anti-chafe creams, balms and powders are arguably some of the most important parts of your long run kit and will be sorely missed — literally — if you leave home without them.

These products will create a protective barrier between your clothing, gear and skin, cutting down on the likelihood that you’ll finish your miles with painful blisters and irritation.

Don’t believe me? Try running a steamy 15-miler sans salve. It’ll hurt in more ways than you think.

Here are 12 products, including some you might already have at home, that will make your long run a little less painful.

Study: Too much salt — and too little — may be bad for you

Study: Too much salt — and too little — may be bad for you

Finally, a study that says it’s OK to lick every grain of salt from the rim of your margarita.

As long as you don’t go overboard.

A massive, four-year research effort by the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada, supports the accepted doctrine that too much salt is bad for your health.

But it also indicates that too little may be harmful as well.

The four-year study, of more than 100,000 people in 18 countries, confirmed that consuming more than 5,000 milligrams of sodium a day contributes to high blood pressure, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

But the blood-pressure effects are less at average levels (3,000 mg to 5,000 mg a day) and aren’t evident at levels of consumption below 3,000 mg, the researchers found.

In crunching the numbers, while the researchers found that low sodium intake was not tied to high blood pressure risk, those who consumed more or less than the recommended range saw increased health risks for cardiovascular conditions.